Research


Modern economics took on a more mathematical orientation starting in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. However, this mathematization does not obscure, or deny, the scientific principles on which economics is based, particularly when it comes to understanding the role of the human person in economic activity. As an economic actor, the efficient cause, the human person is the only real constant across all historical periods. Thus, there is a continuity between ancient and medieval thought in modern economics.

Economics is a practical science under the broad umbrella of philosophy. That being said, since philosophy begins in sense wonder, it originates in the human soul and is thus a psychology. By extension, economics, a practical science, is a habit of the human soul.

My research focuses on the intersection of scholastic philosophy and economics, and encompasses other related disciplines such as philosophical and moral psychology, philosophy of science, leadership, and management. 

Scholars who have directly influenced my thinking:

Sr. Marie Dominic Twohill, O.P., PhD
Peter A. Redpath, PhD
Enrique Martínez García, PhD
Martín F. Echavarría, PhD

Teaching Experience:

Peláez, Marvin. New York Catholic Bible School (Archdiocese of New York, 2004-2014) Basic and Advanced Certificate program.

Peláez, Marvin. Principles of Macroeconomics (undergraduate course, College Now Program, City College of New York, NY, NY, Spring 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011; Fall 2008) 3 credits.

Peláez, Marvin. Economics of Urban Areas (graduate course, Public Service Management (MPA) Program, City College of New York, NY, NY, Spring 2010, 2011) 3 credits.

Peláez, Marvin. Introduction to American Governance and Politics (graduate course, Public Service Management (MPA) Program, City College of New York, NY, NY, Fall 2010) 3 credits.